The World Health Organization adds gaming addiction as a new mental health disorder

As of today, gaming disorder will appear in a new draft of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases, the highly regarded compendium of medical conditions. According to the New York Times, “Concerns about the influence of video games are dovetailing with increasing scrutiny over the harmful aspects of technology, as consumers look for ways to scale back consumption of social media and online entertainment. The W.H.O. designation may help legitimize worries about video game fans who neglect other parts of their lives. It could also make gamers more willing to seek treatment, encourage more therapists to provide it and increase the chances that insurance companies would cover it.” Sources: NY Times WHO...

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Augmented reality may change entertainment as we know it

NY Times highlights the work Snapchat is doing on augmented reality. The revolution starts with 15-second cartoons. Check it out.             NY ...

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Transition to the ICD-10 in the United States: An Emerging Data Chasm

The ICD-9, which was in place for nearly 4 decades in the United States, included unique codes for 14 000 diagnoses and 4000 procedures.1 The ICD-10 expanded to include nearly 70 000 diagnoses and 72 000 procedures,1 allowing better characterization of health care encounters and more closely aligning reimbursement of medical costs to the care delivered. In addition, the ICD-10 can capture greater detail regarding clinical encounters through specific identification of conditions based on etiology, treatment complications, and follow-up encounters for existing conditions. A successful transition from using ICD-9-coded data to ICD-10-coded data would require a rigorous assessment of all potential sources of error. Despite the delayed adoption of ICD-10 coding in the United States, opportunities to learn from other countries are limited and incentives to code may vary by national priorities. [Read more…]...

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Computer Vision App Assists Mental Health Clinicians

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have been developing MultiSense technologies to automatically sense human non-verbal behaviors such as facial expressions, eye gaze, head gestures, and vocal non-verbal behaviors like the voice and its tenseness. The goal is to assist clinicians working with mental health patients with their diagnosis and treatments of mental disorders such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, schizophrenia, and autism. Louis-Philippe Morency, PhD and colleagues describe that one of the primary algorithms, from a computer-vision perspective, is facial landmark detection. It automatically identifies the position of 68 “landmarks” or key points on the face. These were defined over the years as being reliable to track over time. Examples are the eyebrow positions, contour of the mouth, the eye corners, and jaw contours. These are cornerstones for a later stage of analysis because knowing their current shapes really helps understand and recognize the facial expression. This is coupled with things like head-tilt and eye-gaze estimations. The goal of the software is not to diagnose depression, that’s always the job of the doctor. We’re building these algorithms as decision support tools for the clinicians so that they can do their assessments. But from an academic perspective, we do want to know how well these behavioral markers are correlating with the assessment of clinicians. We’ve done this work and seen around a 78% correlation. So it’s not 100%, but our data is significant. We’re definitely heading in the right direction!                Source: MedGadget...

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MIT Develops Temporary Skin Tattoo Interfaces

MIT Media Lab partnering with Microsoft Research, has unveiled DuoSkin, a project that uses temporary tattoos as connected interfaces that can be used in a variety of ways. DuoSkin, as described by MIT researchers, is a fabrication process that allows for the creation of customized functional devices that can be attached onto the skin of users. The project originated from the growing trend of metallic temporary tattoos, making DuoSkin a combination of existing fashion with useful functions in the connected world. Duoskin...

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Adaptive Text Messaging as an Adjunct to Clinical Care

A study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research described a study that was conducted in families with a preschool-aged child recently diagnosed as overweight or obese by their primary care provider. Parents were coached on skills to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors using cognitive behavior therapy. All of the skills were supported using tailored, adaptive text messaging. The novel feature of this program is that the parents helped to create messages that “spoke to them.” Using an automated software application messages were delivered based on desired content, timing, and frequency to support behavior change or skills practice at home. Results a significant increase in parental beliefs in their ability to engage in healthy lifestyles and self-reported healthy lifestyle behaviors. Furthermore, all parents reported the program as being useful, and indicated a desire to have their pediatric primary care incorporate the text messaging as an additional form of communication. JMIR Vol 4, No 1 (2016): Jan-Mar...

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