Category Archives: Psychosis

App for serious mental illness starts clinic-training phase

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) announced funding ($1.8 million) to bring a mental health smartphone app into real world practice. The app is called FOCUS, which has shown promise as a supportive therapy for people who have serious mental illness such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. 

The development team,headed by Dror Ben-Zeev, Ph.D. a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine, have guided the app’s development through early user studies, the most recent of which showed that patients found the digital therapy more engaging than a scheduled trip to the clinic — the far more resource-intensive conventional care.

The next step for FOCUS involves rolling out a system aimed at teaching clinicians how to engage patients to use the app confidently and how to get the most information from patients’ use.

“We demonstrated that FOCUS is clinically potent in several studies, but to move this from academic research to real-world practice, we need an implementation approach that includes digital trainings for clinicians who are not used to mental health apps. This will support their journey as digital health adopters, which is a daunting task for some. We’re creating evergreen materials so any clinician will be able to get FOCUS up and running with their patients quickly,” Ben-Zeev said.

Part of the study is to understand how different clinic staff might need different information upfront about FOCUS to introduce it in a compelling way to their colleagues.

“It could be frontline clinicians or admin support people or team leaders, so we need to ensure that we finely tune the information that helps FOCUS make the greatest impact it can,” Ben-Zeev said.

The FOCUS app has written and video content adapted from in-person, evidence-based interventions. Its treatment domains address:

  • auditory hallucinations (“hearing voices”)
  • mood problems (typically depression and anxiety)
  • sleep
  • social functioning such as social skills training or paranoia
  • medication use (reminders and information to examine counter-therapeutic beliefs that people might have about their medications)

The App is Always Available

The app’s 24/7 availability is a huge advantage for patients who may have mental health needs outside clinic hours and who otherwise might need to wait several weeks or more to address an episode in a clinic environment. 

Moreover, many patients with serious mental illness receive services at community mental health centers. These facilities often are under-resourced and less able to provide continuity of care due to high turnover rates among their staff. FOCUS can provide continuity of care as clinical staffing ebbs and flows, Ben-Zeev said. 

The study will be conducted in collaboration with the adult outpatient programs at community mental health agencies in New Hampshire and Missouri that care for people with serious mental illness: 

Sources:

UW Medicine Newsroom

PCORI News

BRITE Center (Focus Developers)

Using Virtual Reality to Address Serious Mental Illness

OxfordVR Earns FDA’s Breakthrough Device Designation for its gameChange Treatment

Published in Lancet Psychiatry an automated virtual reality therapy program to treat agoraphobic avoidance and distress in patients with psychosis: a multicenter, parallel-group, single-blind, randomized, controlled trial in England was granted FDA’s Breakthrough Device Designation.

Oxford VR develops clinically validated, cost-effective, user-centred cognitive treatments for clinical conditions with significant impact on patients and the healthcare system.

Oxford VR’s developers are drawn from the gaming industry. They apply their animation, illustration and programming skills to help ensure the treatments are not only effective, but also engaging and easy to use. Each VR treatment uses high-quality simulations that promote the best clinical experience.

The Study

The clinical study assessed automated virtual reality therapy to treat agoraphobic avoidance and distress in patients with psychosis. It was a parallel-group, single-blind, randomized, controlled trial across nine National Health Service trusts in England. Eligible patients were aged 16 years or older, with a clinical diagnosis of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder or an affective diagnosis with psychotic symptoms, and had self-reported difficulties going outside due to anxiety. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to either gameChange VR therapy plus usual care or usual care alone. gameChange VR therapy was provided in approximately six sessions over 6 weeks. Trial assessors were masked to group allocation. Outcomes were assessed at 0, 6 (primary endpoint), and 26 weeks after randomization. The primary outcome was avoidance of, and distress in, everyday situations, assessed using the self-reported Oxford Agoraphobic Avoidance Scale (O-AS).

Results

A total of 346 were enrolled. 231 (67%) patients were men and 111 (32%) were women, 294 (85%) were White, and the mean age was 37·2 years (SD 12·5). 174 patients were randomly assigned to the gameChange VR therapy group and 172 to the usual care alone group. Compared with the usual care alone group, the gameChange VR therapy group had significant reductions in agoraphobic avoidance at 6 weeks.

Reductions in threat cognitions and within-situation defense behaviors mediated treatment outcomes. The greater the severity of anxious fears and avoidance, the greater the treatment benefits. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of serious adverse events between the gameChange VR therapy group (12 events in nine patients) and the usual care alone group (eight events in seven patients; p=0·37).

Automated VR therapy led to significant reductions in anxious avoidance of, and distress in, everyday situations compared with usual care alone. gameChange VR therapy has the potential to increase the provision of effective psychological therapy for psychosis, particularly for patients who find it difficult to leave their home, visit local amenities, or use public transport.

Sources:

Freeman D, Lambe S, Kabir T, et al. Automated virtual reality therapy to treat agoraphobic avoidance and distress in patients with psychosis (gameChange): a multicentre, parallel-group, single-blind, randomised, controlled trial in England with mediation and moderation analyses. Lancet Psychiatry 2022; 9: 375–88.Published Online. April 5, 2022. https://doi.org/10.1016/ S2215-0366(22)00060-8 

OxfordVR website

GamechangeVR website